India: Commute the death sentence for Murugan, Santhan and Perarivalan

Posted on October 10, 2011

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Dear Reader,

Although, not a day to celebrate, I hope You are having a wonderful day!

Today it is the World Day Against the Death Penalty, which must be told about. A chance to speak out against the most cruel, inhumane and degrading punishment. Therefore, I would like to give You a chance to try to make India commute the death penalty and foremost the death penalties of the killers of former Prime Minister Rajiv Ghandi.
Copy the text below and send it to: hm@nic.in, with a copy to the Embassy of India stationed in your country. You can check the contact-info here: Embassies in the world, if in Sweden You use: socialsecretary@indianembassy.se.

There is not just this Urgent Action that is circulating on the Web regarding this matter. You can also take action here:
URGENT PETITION TO THE PRESIDENT OF INDIA: STOP HANGING PERARIVALAN, MURUGAN, SANTHAN, DEVENDRANATH DASS AND DEVINDER PAL SINGH
India: Commuted Death Sentence of Murugan, Santhan and Perarivalan

Thanx in advance!

Dear Minister of Home Affairs,

It is with great concern for the life’s of Murugan, Santhan and Perarivalan that I contact You. I do Acknowledge the seriousness of the crime that they have committed – the assassination of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi – but I would like to raise concerns that their stay on death row, since the mercy petition was kept pending for eleven years, may further amount to cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment.
I admire the work the Indian government is doing towards a more democratic and peace-keeping society. Although, this work should not contain a death penalty because it is in all cases the ultimate cruel, inhuman and degrading punishment.

Therefore I would like to ask You to do anything in Your power to:
Commute the death sentence of Murugan, Santhan and Perarivalan;
Reiterate the call of the UN General Assembly to establish a moratorium on executions with a view to abolishing the death penalty (Resolution 62-149), and pointing out that India’s decision to resume executions after a seven-year gap would go against regional and global trends towards abolition of the death penalty.

Yours Sincerely,